Tag: Family Medical Leave Act

The Department of Labor issues 16-page FMLA guide.

The 16-page FMLA guide that the Department of Labor (DOL) says is “designed to answer common FMLA questions and clarify who can take FMLA leave and what protections the FMLA provides.” Entitled “Need Time? The Employee’s Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act,” the Guide apparently was created out of DOL’s belief that “too many workers don’t know about their rights under the FMLA and fail to take advantage of its protections,” as stated in a DOL press release. For more information on the guide, visit the DOL website.

View and download the FMLA Guide

Is your Leave going to exceed the 12 weeks provided by FMLA? You could still be protected under the ADA.

It is common scenario where an employee’s leave of absence for a serious medical condition exceeds the 12 weeks provided for by the Family Medical Leave Act. So what can an employee do in this situation? An employee can request an extended leave of absence as a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (Remember: it is the employees burden to request a reasonable accommodation). This request then shifts the burden to the employer to show that an extended leave would cause “undue hardship.” Read the full article on Extended Leave under the FMLA and ADA.

For more information on the ADA, reasonable accommodations, and what constitutes undue hardship, check out the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) ADA fact sheet.

Employer Requiring No Restrictions or To Be “100% Healed” before Returning to Work?

Is your employer requiring you to be 100% or requiring your doctor to release you back to work with no restrictions? This article deals with the potential legal violations associated with such requirements. For example, the Americans with Disabilities Act only requires you to be qualified. Qualified is defined as able to perform the essential functions of your job with or without a reasonable accommodation. Therefore, if you have restrictions but are able to perform your job with an accommodation, you are entitled to work. For other examples, Read the Full Article Here.